Fat intake increases lung cancer risk

Fat intake increases lung cancer risk

New research studies have shown a clear pattern: Higher lung cancer rates are associated with greater fat intake. It appears that fat from the foods you eat acts as a sort of fertilizer on cancerous tumors, encouraging their growth and ability to spread, as well as impairing your immune defenses against them. In fact, the particles in the bloodstream that carry fat and cholesterol also escort chemical carcinogens from place to place in the body. We have long known that it's a good idea to minimize fat intake, and avoiding lung cancer is yet another reason. One study, initiated in 1960 and conducted in seven countries, showed that high fat intake, particularly the saturated fat we find in animal products, was linked to lung cancer deaths. Cutting the fat is a necessary step, like clearing clogged pipes so fresh water can move through easily. By piling your plate with cancer-fighting veggies, your protection increases exponentially. Try making veggie lasagna with spinach, mushrooms, eggplant, and soy cheese instead of ground beef and mozzarella.

Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Cancer, Physicians Committee For Responsible Medicine.

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